Cho-tokkyu (The Cider “Super Express/Bullet Train”) by Crispin Cider Company

582061_10101370715537040_1152586743_nRating: 4.8/5 *Cider Rating

Cho-tokkyu or Choutokkyu (The Cider “Super Express/Bullet Train”) Artisanal Reserve by Crispin Cider Company is a 6.5% ABV Cider Fermented in Sake yeast and organic rice syrup.

Label: 
Naturally fermented with authentic Sake yeast using a premium blend of fresh pressed apple juice, not from concentrate, with no added malt, spirit, or grape alcohol. A racy, high-speed cider that remains crisp and well balanced. Cloudy and straw colored with an exotic polished complexity. Cho-tokkyu is clean, vibrant with an authentic dry sake finish and a distinctive apple backbone. Cho-tokkyu Artisanal Reserve cloudy hard cider is unfiltered and uses racked apple wine smoothed with pure organic, gluten free, rice syrup. No added colorants, sorbate or benzoate preservatives. Best served cool to cold. As with all our Artisanal Reserves, give a full bottoms-up tilt and swirl to disperse unfiltered apple-wine sediment evenly.
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Next in the line of sought after ciders I have tried. Many of them awesome, like the ones that use Irish Stout and Trappist yeast and even the Whiskey barrel aged ones. Simply phenomenal and delicious. Yes it may be made by Coors, but Ciders tend to be on a league of their own. This one is made with Sake yeast. I have tried many sake before I am familiar with the taste and the smell. Also, this beer unlike many ciders I have seen is actually more clearer white than yellow. Almost a Lemonade kind of color,

The aromas are of sake for sure, rice, apples, vanilla notes, sugar dough, and hints of coconut. Not much to the aromas but these little aromas a pretty dead on.

The sake notes in the flavor definitely shine as well as the bit of milky rice and vanilla notes. The cider has flavors of apples, slight earthy bitterness, melons, small hints of coconut but extremely subtle, chia seed juice, citrus hints, cinnamon, tapioca pudding, sweet bread and honey.

The aftertaste is pretty dry leaving only a little bit of the apple, rice and milky coconut aftertaste. Not much alcohol to talk about either but it definitely goes down smooth and is quite refreshing

Overall it is a very good cider. Maybe not as complex as the other ones but this one started getting a lot better as it warmed up. Some more notes of like doughy red bean ice cream, tapioca and milky coconut started to come out which made it very enjoyable. Hell, even some horchata notes in there too  . Definitely a different cider for sure.

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Faster, Bigger, Better, Bolder (Gradually, Quietly, Steadily) Collaboration by The Bruery and Dogfish Head

561586_10101353305317260_515181196_n 1238112_10101353308041800_1114235904_n 1004932_10101353309314250_926516231_n 1231294_10101353303510880_121072834_nRating: 4.6/5

Faster, Bigger, Better, Bolder (Gradually, Quietly, Steadily) Collaboration by The Bruery and Dogfish Head is an 8.25% ABV Japanese Herb/Spiced Beer brewed with Kumquats, spices and Sake yeast

Label:
We brewed this beer to honor our brethren in Japan who stood strong in face of adversity when faced with disaster. Created with traditional Japanese ingredients and sake yeast, this beer is best consumed fresh.

COMMERCIAL DESCRIPTION (Ratebeer.com)
Two of the most out-of-the-box breweries around, The Bruery and Dogfish Head recently combined forces on a brew; the result is as intriguing as one might expect. Inspired by the strength of the Japanese people to remain sturdy during the recent earthquake that hit their small island nation, the beer’s depth of flavor comes from flavors steeped in tradition. The ale is brewed with a spin on the traditional shichimi togarashi, or Japanese seven spice blend. Ginger, cayenne, white sesame seeds, black sesame seeds, poppy seeds, and nori were added to a base blonde ale that was created using two kinds of rice. Replacing the typical orange peel included in shichimi, whole kumquats were pulverized and added to the whirlpool, giving the spiced beer a kick of fresh citrus. A blend of sake yeast and The Bruery’s house yeast was used to ferment this beer into a dry and complex ale, different than anything you’ve likely had before. One dollar from every bottle sold will be going to help the brewers and beer drinkers of Japan in need of our support to fight back from disaster.
First in the Collaboration Series for the Bruery.
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I remember I had always wanted to get my hands on this beer but never got the chance. I found this one at the 38 degrees Grill in Alhambra California. It seems this beer was made in 2011 in commemoration of the March 11, 2011 Earthquake in Japan. It seems the beer was also named after that Daft Punk Song (Harder, Better, Faster Stronger). Regardless, the beer states best consumed fresh. Will this be past it’s prime or just at the perfect serving? Not too sure but keep reading to find out.

Aromas seem fresh still :). Citrus, peaches, apricot, kumquats, apples, mango, biscuit bread, caramel, wine grapes, coriander, wheat bread, herbs, flowers, hibiscus, lemon peel, green tea, funky notes and and slightly peppery

The flavors are of grapes, apples, citrus lemon peel, kumquats, peaches, honey, biscuit bread, coriander, rice sake, green tea, peppercorns, hints of caramel, peach cobbler, hints of mango, floral notes, herbs and spices

The aftertaste leaves pretty dry with only hints of the grapes, citrus, biscuit bread and sake notes. Still a refreshing beer amazingly and drinks smooth as well.

Overall the beer is surprisingly still awesome. Aged for 2 years and it is still awesome. So it makes me wonder how much fresher it was having it in 2011 and having it now. Regardless, still a pretty good beer. Biiru wa, totemo oishii desuyo!! Kanpai! ^_^b