Faster, Bigger, Better, Bolder (Gradually, Quietly, Steadily) Collaboration by The Bruery and Dogfish Head

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Faster, Bigger, Better, Bolder (Gradually, Quietly, Steadily) Collaboration by The Bruery and Dogfish Head is an 8.25% ABV Japanese Herb/Spiced Beer brewed with Kumquats, spices and Sake yeast

Label:
We brewed this beer to honor our brethren in Japan who stood strong in face of adversity when faced with disaster. Created with traditional Japanese ingredients and sake yeast, this beer is best consumed fresh.

COMMERCIAL DESCRIPTION (Ratebeer.com)
Two of the most out-of-the-box breweries around, The Bruery and Dogfish Head recently combined forces on a brew; the result is as intriguing as one might expect. Inspired by the strength of the Japanese people to remain sturdy during the recent earthquake that hit their small island nation, the beer’s depth of flavor comes from flavors steeped in tradition. The ale is brewed with a spin on the traditional shichimi togarashi, or Japanese seven spice blend. Ginger, cayenne, white sesame seeds, black sesame seeds, poppy seeds, and nori were added to a base blonde ale that was created using two kinds of rice. Replacing the typical orange peel included in shichimi, whole kumquats were pulverized and added to the whirlpool, giving the spiced beer a kick of fresh citrus. A blend of sake yeast and The Bruery’s house yeast was used to ferment this beer into a dry and complex ale, different than anything you’ve likely had before. One dollar from every bottle sold will be going to help the brewers and beer drinkers of Japan in need of our support to fight back from disaster.
First in the Collaboration Series for the Bruery.
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I remember I had always wanted to get my hands on this beer but never got the chance. I found this one at the 38 degrees Grill in Alhambra California. It seems this beer was made in 2011 in commemoration of the March 11, 2011 Earthquake in Japan. It seems the beer was also named after that Daft Punk Song (Harder, Better, Faster Stronger). Regardless, the beer states best consumed fresh. Will this be past it’s prime or just at the perfect serving? Not too sure but keep reading to find out.

Aromas seem fresh still :). Citrus, peaches, apricot, kumquats, apples, mango, biscuit bread, caramel, wine grapes, coriander, wheat bread, herbs, flowers, hibiscus, lemon peel, green tea, funky notes and and slightly peppery

The flavors are of grapes, apples, citrus lemon peel, kumquats, peaches, honey, biscuit bread, coriander, rice sake, green tea, peppercorns, hints of caramel, peach cobbler, hints of mango, floral notes, herbs and spices

The aftertaste leaves pretty dry with only hints of the grapes, citrus, biscuit bread and sake notes. Still a refreshing beer amazingly and drinks smooth as well.

Overall the beer is surprisingly still awesome. Aged for 2 years and it is still awesome. So it makes me wonder how much fresher it was having it in 2011 and having it now. Regardless, still a pretty good beer. Biiru wa, totemo oishii desuyo!! Kanpai! ^_^b

Red Poppy Ale by The Lost Abbey

304305_10101089984459370_2002973560_nRating: 4.5/5

Red Poppy Ale by The Lost Abbey is 5%ABV Flanders Red Ale brewed with poppy seeds, cherries and aged in oak barrels.

Label: 
Perhaps no country embraces the use of fruit in beers more so than Belgium. Numerous traditional as well as regional specialty ales are infused with every sort of fruit imaginable. In this way, the flavor of the fruit becomes especially prominent. 

Red Poppy Ale is a veritable celebration of Sour Cherries in an explosion of aromas and tastes. Brewed from a brown ale base and aged in our oak barrels for over 6 months, this beer is not for the faint of heart. The Golden Poppy is the state flower of California and the Red Poppy is found in Flanders Fields where our inspiration for this beer comes from.
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It has been a while since I last this one. Almost like 2 years. I decided to do another go to see how it is. The fragrance is nice and sour like I remember it. Aromas of cherries, peach, some oak and coffee bread like notes, somewhat flowery, grape, raisins, some vanilla, almost chocolate scent, wine, sweet bread, brown sugar and caramel. The flavors are of immediate tart cherry, wine grapes, peach, apples, vanilla, sour tart cranberries, coffee cake, a little bit of chocolate, raisins, green apples, some slight raisin bread pudding, caramel, some citrus sour and funky notes. This beer is reminiscent of La Roja from Jolly pumpkin except this one is more focused on other different types of flavors other than wine. Sour beer lovers will like this one although for me, while it is still pretty awesome in terms of sours, I have tried other sours like those of JP and were pretty delicious. The Lost Abbey is one of my favorite breweries and their beers are definitely world class 🙂

2011 Review:
Lost abbey Red Poppy ale. Flanders Red Ale brewed with cherries. No head from the pour. Awesome fragrance of cherries, vanilla , and peach immediately overwhelm the nose. The taste is a complex mix of sour tart cherries with oak like after taste. Lost Abbey yeast is also present as usual :P. In short, like smelling and drinking a flower..LOL Red Poppy..desert like brew >:3